Developing a Management Team

Without having the benefit of an experienced, professional, and cohesive senior management team when they start and grow their companies, Entrepreneurs in order to expand and be successful in the long term must build a capable management team.

Blending in-house, on-the-job trained leaders complemented by key, experienced outside professionals (hired over a period), provide the Entrepreneurs the most cost-effective team. Identifying in-house personnel and training them to be managers should be the Entrepreneur’s focus once day-to-day operations have been delegated. Assessing the gaps in leadership, determining the management needs and recruiting appropriate outside leaders becomes the next step.

Having a management team in place is not enough. Entrepreneurs continually need to develop teamwork and cohesion to make the executives more effective for the long term. Entrepreneurs should find ways to train, motivate and reward the management team in a way that facilitates a group that can successfully grow the company, and allow the Founder/Entrepreneur to pursue other ventures.

Ravi Patel

http://www.patelCFOservices.com

Advertisements

Entrepreneurs Shouldn’t be Heroes

Entrepreneurs are sometimes pressured into thinking of themselves as heroes trying to create miracles.

Miracles happen infrequently. While Entrepreneurs might feel that they have to be heroes to rescue their company from all situations, it is not always possible and more importantly not the right thing to do.

Companies need long-term leadership that successfully builds the organization with a great employee team to solve problems and exploit opportunities in the absence of the leader. Relying on a hero creates dependence and can only work in the short term or in a few instances.

Entrepreneurs might think of themselves as super-heroes for starting the company and making it grow though its infancy, strong business leadership is necessary to nurture the organization for long-term growth and success.

Be a Leader NOT a Hero!

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on March 7, 2017 at 4:33 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , ,

Forming a Cohesive Team

Entrepreneurs do not have an experienced, professional, and cohesive senior leadership team when they start and grow their companies. In order to expand their company and be successful in the long term, Entrepreneurs must build a capable, cohesive leadership team.

An optimal blend of in-house, on-the-job trained leaders complemented by key, experienced outside professionals (hired over a period), provide the Entrepreneurs the most cost-effective team. Identifying in-house managers and training them to be leaders should be the Entrepreneur’s focus once day-to-day operations have been delegated. Assessing the gaps in leadership, determining the management needs and recruiting appropriate outside leaders follows in the process.

Having a leadership team in place is not sufficient. Entrepreneurs continually need to develop teamwork and cohesion to make the executives more effective for the long term. Entrepreneurs should find ways to train, motivate and reward the leadership team in a way that facilitates a group that can successfully grow the company, and allow the Founder/Entrepreneur to pursue other ventures.

Ravi Patel

http://www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on December 13, 2016 at 4:02 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , ,

Entrepreneur as Own Boss

People who work for themselves are happier because of the freedom that working  for one’s self permits. So valuable is the opportunity to be one’s own boss that  studies show you have to pay people twice as much to get them to work for others and still have the same level of job satisfaction as being self-employed.

Entrepreneurs often start businesses as they want to work for themselves and not for others.

Being your own boss will grant you freedom, but it does come with serious responsibilities. No one else is there to take responsibility of your company and its stakeholders other than you.

Self discipline is paramount as someone else is not telling you what to do each day – you need to set you own agenda. Setting an example of leadership for the organization is your responsibility – there is nobody else above you. If you consistently play hookey, how can you expect your people to work?

Freedom is great, but make sure you learn to be a responsible “boss” for yourself!

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on June 14, 2016 at 3:57 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , ,

Leadership by Example

Leaders often encourage their followers “to give their best” to whatever they are doing. Entrepreneurs do the same when motivating employees towards fulfilling the Mission of the company.

In a team environment it is normal for all employees to contribute to fulfilling the objectives of the mission. However, is it always true for the leaders?

If Entrepreneurs expect the best from their employees, then they too should give their very best to the employees and the company. Do they? Leadership by example is not just a catchy phrase!

Entrepreneurs need to give their best to the organization to inspire their employees to do their very best. If Entrepreneurs show an attitude of “do what I say, not what I do,” their employees are not going to be motivated for the long haul.

Doing the right things for leaders means giving 100% or more to prove to the employees that they all are part of the same team and everyone needs to contribute their very best.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on May 24, 2016 at 4:12 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , ,

Lessons for Entrepreneurs from Martin Luther King

The nation celebrated Martin Luther King’s birthday yesterday. It is interesting to review what lessons Entrepreneurs can learn from Martin Luther King (MLK).

Dave Kerpen wrote an article on Inc. on January 19, 2004 listing seven lessons from MLK that are still relevant today. Here is my summary:

  1. Dream big – if you don’t dream big, you can’t achieve significant things
  2. Persuade without power – don’t be a “boss.” but be a leader through the power of persuasion
  3. Give people something to believe in – have passion in your Vision so people are compelled to adopt it
  4. Embrace fear and be courageous anyway – be honest with people about the challenges but have the courage to face them anyway
  5. Get everyone involved – Entrepreneurs can’t do everything themselves. They need to have other people involved to build their company.
  6. Create a sense of urgency – have a bias for action to get ahead of competition
  7. Inspire people – without inspiring leadership it merely becomes a job for your people. Have them motivated to fulfill your Vision.

These are lessons that Entrepreneurs can definitely learn from and adopt.

 Ravi Patel

http://www.patelCFOservices.com

Letting Go Gracefully

It is always a balance as to when an Entrepreneur needs to let go and delegate responsibility of the business to someone else. If one leaves too early, the Mission and Vision might remain unaccomplished per the Entrepreneur’s original intent. Hanging on too long might jeopardize long-term success.

“Don’t let go too soon and don’t hang on too long.” – Mitch Albom. Quite useful advice for Entrepreneurs.

Leaving the business to pursue other ventures is all dependent on to whom the Entrepreneur is relinquishing control. If the Entrepreneur has built up a strong leadership team and a solid foundation to accomplish the Mission, delegating responsibility to run the business to a competent CEO is prudent. However, if the leadership team and the new CEO are not seasoned and well-developed, the Entrepreneur risks a lot by leaving too soon.

Hanging on too long can be an issue also. If the business has grown beyond the capability of the Entrepreneur to successfully run it, it might be damaging to hang on to power. A new CEO is absolutely necessary then. Alternatively, if the Entrepreneur has recruited a solid leadership team and a likely CEO and trained them, hanging on will be demotivating to the capable successor CEO and the  team as they cannot show off their potential.

If the Entrepreneur runs the business on without a secondary leadership team and wants to continue doing so, he/she does not face the question of leaving too early or hanging on. But is that continued retention of control achieving well the Mission and Vision of the business?

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Maintaining Control

New Entrepreneurs like to maintain control.

However, understanding and managing their sphere of “control” is crucial in growing their businesses.

When Entrepreneurs start their businesses, they feel like they need to have total control over everything that goes on in their organization. All decisions are made by them and nothing can be done without their say so.

As the business grows, the Entrepreneur is forced to give up some control and delegate tasks to other. He or she still wants to know what happened. When successful, the Entrepreneur has to transfer responsibilities to a secondary level of leadership. In that stage he or she cannot keep track of all details.

At every stage of the growth of the company, the Entrepreneur reduces his/her sphere of direct control. This is very difficult for most Entrepreneurs, especially in the first business venture.

Building a stong secondary leadership team, guiding and mentoring the team, and periodically monitoring their accomplishments towards specific objectives and the overall Mission will reduce the anxiety of the Entrepreneur. If the Entrepreneur cannot learn to reduce his/her sphere of control, it will create stress that might be detrimental.

When things fall outside your sphere of direct control (to lower levels of the organization), resist the temptation to wrest such control or stress about it. Focus on the bigger picture.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

The Courage to Make the Right Decisions

Faced with hundreds of decisions, how do Entrepreneurs go about making the right ones?

Generally effective decisions are made with facts, experience, skills and other people’s input gained over time. Sometimes one’s gut or instinct plays an important role too.

Regardless of how an Entrepreneur arrives at it, the perceived popularity of his/her decision should never be a factor in the decision making process. Do what is right, not what is popular!

Right and wrong does not depend upon how many people are for or against a decision. Entrepreneurial leadership is not a popularity contest, but rather leading people the right way towards fulfilling a common Mission. Popularity comes and goes, but true leadership remains.

Entrepreneurs need to have the courage to make the right decisions.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on May 19, 2015 at 3:28 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , ,

Asking for Assistance

” I need help!” These three words are so misunderstood, especially by Entrepreneurs.

Asking for assistance is sometimes incorrectly perceived by Entrepreneurs as a weakness in leadership or deficiency. Or as, it is too expensive to ask for help. Nothing could be farther from the truth!

It is widely accepted that Entrepreneurs initially start businesses because of unique, innovative ideas – not because they are professional chief executives. It is not fair to expect that Entrepreneurs are well versed in all major functional areas of a business. Asking for help in areas that are not their strength is not a sign of weakness.

In fact, soliciting assistance at the right time is rational and could save Entrepreneurs time, people resources, and money in the long term. As a strategy, Entrepreneurs may want to create  a team of advisers whom they can ask for help at any time.

Asking for help at the right time is smart business.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on March 17, 2015 at 4:30 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , , ,