Making a Business Out of Your Idea

Technologically savvy Entrepreneurs start their business as they might have a unique product or application. Their understanding of their technology and their belief in the breadth of its superiority over competitors might make them think that success could be a slam dunk.

Entrepreneurs might start out by thinking that way, but their success really depends upon understanding the “business” of their technology.

No one ever became rich by building a better mouse-trap; rather, it is getting that product to the marketplace at a reasonable cost and convincing customers to buy it that leads to success. A tremendous amount of business thinking, planning and execution goes into making an idea a winner.

Answers to questions such as:

  • can the product be made cost-effectively with consistent quality on a mass scale,
  • can the technology be protected from competitors,
  • can it be delivered to the consumer over a wide territory and on time,
  • can it be marketed and sold effectively

and many more are necessary to make a sustainable business out on an idea.

Have you really thought about how to make a business out of your unique technological idea?

Ravi Patel

Published in: on June 11, 2019 at 4:30 am  Leave a Comment  
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Have a Playbook

With the football season is in full swing, it is impossible to miss the coaches on the sidelines with a color-coded sheet of possible plays to be called for that game. The head coach with all the assistant coaches spend hours prior to the game analyzing their competitor’s game, strengths and weaknesses, strategies and so on and blend it with their own team’s core competencies to create a game-plan for winning. Disciplined coaches with a good playbook are generally winners.

Entrepreneurs, do you have similar “playbook” for major strategic actions to be used against, in or with competitors, marketplace, economy, opportunities, employees and so on? Have you worked with your key leadership team to develop such a playbook?

Winning on the field, analogous to the marketplace, requires a lot of planning, analysis, strategizing to come up with the ideal game-plan for success. A playbook for winning a football game is similar to one required for succeeding in business.

Create a playbook for your business and ensure that you call the right play for the situation. Do the Right Things!

Ravi Patel

http://www.PatelCFOServices.com

Does Your Business Have Weaknesses?

The obvious answer is “yes.” More importantly, how do you find out your weaknesses?

The Entrepreneur can do an honest assessment and perform an in-depth, critical review. He/She could involve the management team in this process and have them openly, without fear of recrimination, list each area of weakness in the business. Have each manager of a functional area review not only his/her own area, but also other functions in the company.

The Entrepreneur can also solicit frank feedback from the Board of Directors and mentors regarding the areas that need improvement. Such feedback is more likely to be objective depending upon the relationship with the Entrepreneur.

The truest assessment of your weaknesses will come from competitors if you can obtain such information. Competitors analyze the business of their rivals very carefully to develop strategies to compete not only against their strengths but also to exploit their weaknesses. If you can find a way to gain analysis of your weaknesses performed by your competitors, it would be very useful in your strategic planning process.

Something to ponder ….

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Finding your Weaknesses

As a part of the strategic planning process, it is important for Entrepreneurs  to do a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis on their business and develop strategies for each area.

How do you find out your weaknesses?

The Entrepreneur can do an honest assessment and perform an in-depth, critical review. He/She could involve the management team in this process and have them openly, without fear of recrimination, list each area of weakness in the business. Have each manager of a functional area review not only his/her own area, but also other functions in the company.

The Entrepreneur can also solicit frank feedback from the Board of Directors and mentors regarding the areas that need improvement. Such feedback is more likely to be objective depending upon the relationship with the Entrepreneur.

The truest assessment of your weaknesses will come from competitors if you can obtain such information. Competitors analyze the business of their rivals very carefully to develop strategies to compete not only against their strengths but also to exploit their weaknesses. If you can find a way to gain analysis of your weaknesses performed by your competitors, it would be very useful in your strategic planning process.

Something to ponder ….

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

 

Published in: on January 29, 2013 at 4:58 am  Leave a Comment  
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