Short Yet Effective in Your Communications

Do you believe that to effectively communicate your message you need to use more words? Is using too few sentences reducing the importance of your communications? Is being verbose mean you are saying something important? If you think so, you might be wrong!

Effective communication means driving home your point powerfully in as less words as possible.

People have a very short attention span, especially potential investors. If you can’t communicate your message succinctly yet powerfully, you might lose your audience. That is not a good thing for Entrepreneurs.

Regardless of your target audience – investors, clients, employees, vendors, bankers or others – learn to fine tune your message. Make it short and simple, yet effective for them to understand and retain. The longer you speak or write, the less is absorbed.

People will not say that you didn’t speak long enough, but they will definitely tell you that your message was short but effective. What would you rather prefer?

Ravi Patel

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Keeping it Simple

Do you believe that you need more words to effectively communicate your message? Does using too few sentences reduce the importance of your point? Is being verbose mean you are saying something important? If you think so, you might be wrong!

Effective communication means driving home your point powerfully in as few words as possible with a simple message.

People have a very short attention span, especially potential investors. If you can’t communicate your message succinctly yet powerfully, you might lose your audience. That is not a good thing.

Regardless of the target audience for Entrepreneurs – investors, clients, employees, vendors, bankers or others – learn to fine tune your message. Make it short and simple, yet effective for them to understand and retain. The longer you speak or write, the less is absorbed.

People will not say that you didn’t speak long enough, but they will definitely give you feedback that your message was short but effective. Which is preferable?

Ravi Patel

http://www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on August 23, 2016 at 4:15 am  Leave a Comment  
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Keep Your Message Simple

Effective communication is essential to the role of an Entrepreneur. Regardless of the stakeholders that one is addressing proper messaging is critical.

Do you believe that to effectively communicate your message you need to use more words? Is using too few sentences reducing the importance of your communications? Is being verbose mean that you are saying something important? If you think so, you might be wrong!

Effective communication means driving home your point powerfully in as few words as possible.

People have a very short attention span, especially potential investors. If you can’t communicate your message succinctly yet powerfully, you might lose your audience. That is not a good thing.

Regardless of your target audience – investors, clients, employees, vendors, bankers or others – learn to fine tune your message. Make it short and simple, yet effective for them to understand and retain. The longer you speak or write, the less is absorbed.

People will not say that you didn’t speak long enough, but they will definitely tell you that your message was short but effective. What would you rather prefer?

Ravi Patel

http://www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on May 17, 2016 at 4:09 am  Leave a Comment  
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Communicating Bad News

All Entrepreneurs at one time or another are faced with situations where they might have to share some bad news with clients. What do you do?

If you are faced with a situation where you cannot deliver a product/service to a client per the original scope, there is a quality problem, a delay in performance, cost overruns, and so on; if or when do you communicate this news to the client?

  1. Inform them right away that you are facing a problem situation and the company is actively working on a plan for correction,
  2. Communicate the problem situation and the corrective action plan after it has been developed,
  3. Do not communicate this to the client until they find out. At that time inform them that you were aware of the problem and were working on the solution, or
  4. Never inform the client hoping it will go away. If it surfaces, blame someone else in your company.

The Entrepreneur’s consistent philosophy in addressing the above situation with either one of these or other scenarios determines the long-term relationship with clients and success of the company.

What do you do when faced with such a situation? Do the Right Things!

Ravi Patel

http://www.patelCFOservices.com

Simplify your Message

Do you believe that to effectively communicate your message you need to use more words? Is using too few sentences reducing the importance of your communications? Is being verbose mean you are saying something important? If you think so, you might be wrong!

Effective communication means driving home your point powerfully in as less words as possible.

People have a very short attention span, especially potential investors. If you can’t communicate your message succinctly yet powerfully, you might lose your audience. That is not a good thing.

Regardless of your target audience – investors, clients, employees, vendors, bankers or others – learn to fine tune your message. Make it short and simple, yet effective for them to understand and retain. The longer you speak or write, the less is absorbed.

People will not say that you didn’t speak long enough, but they will definitely tell you that your message was short but effective. What would you rather prefer?

Ravi Patel

http://www.patelCFOservices.com

 

 

Published in: on May 28, 2014 at 3:47 am  Leave a Comment  
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Keeping it Simple

If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough – Albert Einstein.

When Entrepreneurs are asked to describe their product or service, they sometimes go into great details to explain how something works. In their opinion, the more complex it sounds the more important the idea.

It is actually the opposite. The simpler the description of your product or idea, the easier it is to understand. If a potential investor can grasp your idea immediately, their interest is perked and they might listen to more. If you lose them with complexity, their attention span is over.

This is also true for all stakeholders. Entrepreneurs should make their message simple when communicating change. Simple messages get accepted a lot faster than complex ones.

As Einstein notes, it is possible that Entrepreneurs don’t understand the product, service or idea well enough to explain in simple terms. If so, it is time to go back to the drawing board and learn what you are trying to explain so you can make it simpler to communicate.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on November 5, 2013 at 4:21 am  Leave a Comment  
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Hearing, But Not Listening

How often do you face situations where people appear to be hearing you intently, but end up doing some thing quite contrary or not exactly in line with what you were asking them to do. Invariably in all these situations, people are indeed hearing you, but not listening. There is a significant distinction.

The other day I was in a restaurant and asked the waitress for a glass of water without ice. She did bring me the glass of water, but with ice. She heard me say water, but did not listen completely for it to register that I did not want ice.

Entrepreneurs need to be aware that what they ask their people may be heard by them, but they might not be listening completely to follow the request correctly. What should Entrepreneurs do? Develop a routine to ask their people to repeat or paraphrase what is being requested of them, especially for significant issues. This allows the Entrepreneur to confirm that the listening process was correct and complete.

On the other hand, Entrepreneurs should be mindful that they too listen to their employees completely and do not fall into the trap of perfunctory hearing. Effective communication is a two-way street!

Ravi Patel

 

Confusion Kills Excellent Business Processes

While travelling recently, we stopped at a food establishment in the airport.  This chain had an established process of ordering and delivery of food items. However, this process was neither intuitive nor well-posted for patrons to understand, creating confusion and frustration.

There is a lesson for Entrepreneurs. As you focus on reviewing and improving business processes, do not forget that such processes have to be well understood by the users. There should be a strong emphasis on effective communication of the established processes.

For external users of your business processes, such as clients and vendors, lack of proper communication could negate the effectiveness of your procedures regardless of their excellence. Periodic follow-up with these users as to their understanding and feedback on the process would create an opportunity for refinements.

For internal users, communication combined with training is absolutely necessary. Developing a business process, no matter how good it is, will be effective only if your employees understand it.

Develop, improve, effectively communicate and fully train the users about each business process, otherwise confusion will kill your processes.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Informational Lunches

H9ving lunches outside office premises to meet and discuss issues with clients, vendors or other business associates is common for Entrepreneurs.

Entrepreneurs, have you considered having regular informational lunches in-house to communicate with employees? Periodic lunches with employees on an informal basis where employees bring their own lunch and sit around a table to discuss business issues may be beneficial.

You might even want to have a speaker share information on general informational topics or have focused presentations on technical subjects. Limit such sessions to no more than 20-25 minutes.

Periodic, informal yet informational lunches with employees may serve as a powerful communication medium for Entrepreneurs.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com