Resisting Temptation to Blame Others

Don’t find fault, find a remedy – Henry Ford . Entrepreneurs could learn a lot from this statement.

In a blame-rich rather than solution-oriented culture, leaders (mostly political) often seek out whom to accuse of problems rather than finding solutions. This sometimes extends to poorly run companies with unhealthy culture and negative management practices.

In reality, it should be acceptable for leaders to hold people accountable for their performance. However, it is not wise to continually blame others for problems. Entrepreneurs have to take responsibility for the issues facing their business and teach their managers to do the same.

More importantly, blaming others or even accepting responsibility does not solve the problem. Entrepreneurs need to create a culture where finding solutions or remedies to issues takes precedence over blame. Such a positive culture allows people to readily accept responsibility for decisions without having to face ridicule.

Do the Right Thing by creating a solution-oriented culture in your company and incorporating that in your Mission.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

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Being Fair Might be Unpopular

Good leadership is about making optimal decisions for the company as a whole, not only for certain segments of stakeholders.

Entrepreneurs are loyal to people, especially those who helped them start the business and were early employees. As the company grows, Entrepreneurs have to make decisions that might be tough, unfair to some, and unpopular.

Fair decisions involve doing the right things even it means that some people might be adversely affected by such actions. Business decisions cannot be optimal if everyone’s interest is always taken into account. Entrepreneurs, on the other hand, should not in any way go out of their way to make decisions that purposely hurt certain people. That would be grossly unfair.

While difficult, make fair decisions for your business that are ethical even if they might cause hardship for some people and be unpopular.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

 

Published in: on June 20, 2017 at 4:05 am  Leave a Comment  
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Adding Value as a Performance Indicator

While most traditional ways focus on actual performance against expectations or against established goals to rate employee performance, here is a different perspective.

Entrepreneurs should put employees into three categories – those who add direct value to your business, those that are neutral or add indirect value, and those that reduce company value.

Pay special attention to the first category by training and motivating them so that they continue to add value. Have a strong retention program for these individuals so that they don’t leave your organizations.

Deal immediately with people who reduce the value of your company. These are the bad apples that need to be removed from the company as soon as possible.

The people who are neutral as far as their contribution to company value need to be either moved to the category of employees that add value by training, or red-circled if they are providing a support function to the first category of employees. If there is a chance that they would reduce the value to your company, they need to be transitioned out.

Rating employee performance based on impact on company value and dealing with them appropriately will go a long way in building the value of your company.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Accepting Mistakes

Great inventions were inspired by mistakes. Entrepreneurs like everyone else make mistakes, so their tolerance towards their employees making mistakes is expected.

Entrepreneurs should create a business culture that does not penalize people from thinking outside the box and making mistakes. An organization cannot grow if no one takes risks just to avoid making mistakes.

Making mistakes is acceptable if it is during the process of trying new methods or ideas. However, it is essential to learn from these mistakes and prevent future occurrences. People should grow by learning from their mistakes.

If an employee keeps on making the same mistake again and again despite training, coaching and direction, then that situation is not acceptable. It is no longer is a process of learning and ultimately hurts the organization.

Making a mistake is acceptable. Not learning from that mistake is bad; making the same mistake repeatedly is worse.

Ravi Patel

www.patelCFOservices.com

Published in: on June 6, 2017 at 4:47 am  Leave a Comment  
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